risk assessment

Risk Assessing A New Shooting Permission

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Being granted new shooting permission is a red letter day for any shooter. How many of us, though, seriously consider whether the ground is suitable for our rifles and their calibres? If you’re shooting ‘on ticket’, your FEO (firearms enquiry officer) will insist that any new ground is covered by existing approval … or may want to visit the land. If you are an experienced shooter, known to your FEO’s, you can apply for an open Firearms Certificate. This has to be signed off by your counties Police Chief and basically means that they consider you experienced enough to risk assess and shoot around any land where you have been granted permission to shoot by the owner. It will be up to you to judge if land is suitable for the rifles you hold. When you consider it, that is a huge privilege and not to be taken lightly. Anyone who allows you to shoot on their land is relying on your credibility, common sense and integrity. they expect you to shoot safely and never engage them in controversy or legal liability. Personally, I won’t work a permission (no matter how much I desire to) until I’ve walked the land and carried out a complete risk assessment. If (as I usually do) I walk or drive the land with the owner, I’ll point out my observations as we tour the permission. Trust me, this will reassure anyone who has just given you permission. Oh … just how, exactly, can you secure permission? Just watch this space, that’s up next. This piece explains what I will look for on a risk assessment tour … and don’t worry, we’re not filling in forms here. The whole thing is just a visual appraisal. Which is how your FEO would do it.

Boundaries

Requesting a boundary tour with the land-owner might not always get a result. Whether they are willing or not, when you get your permission note signed make sure you take a satellite map print of the permitted land and a highlighter pen so that the owner can at least clarify the boundaries and any public rights of way.

Rights Of Way

Check whether public rights of way are established or permissive (footpaths, tracks, rides, bridleways). This could be important and I would recommend anyone who doesn’t understand the law around shooting and ‘rights of way’ to read the highly informative BASC guide (Shooting, Rights Of Way and Access). Just search their website.

Livestock

Ensure you know where any livestock will be, particularly if you are taking a shooting dog along with you. I’m completely happy working in and around cattle, sheep, pigs, poultry (all of which attract all manner of vermin). My lurcher is solid and, if necessary, can be sent away to wait if the beasts are disturbed by his presence.

The Dog  Risk Assessment

The probability on most new grounds are that your dog, if you take one along, is more at risk than you or anything else. Remember that they will be excited by new ground and new scents. While carrying out an initial risk assessment, think about it from a dogs view too. Barbed wire, ditches and dykes, abandoned agricultural kit. Even the old farmyard mouser or the sheepdog can offer ‘risk’ that you need to avoid.

 

Infrastructure

Explore the lands infrastructure, Barns, cattle-sheds, glasshouses etc. Learn where equipment and vehicles are stored. Safety-check the buildings. There might be ‘something nasty in the woodshed’. This one looks like a good spot for ambushing rats and pigeons but that roof is a disaster waiting to happen. I won’t be lingering under that for long!

The Farmyard

You might have permission to shoot but the landowner, their family and their pets are likely to be around at times too. If you are going to shoot around a farmyard or work area, learn where the people and pets will be. Better still, when the quiet times are, when there will be few people around. This is how I like my farms when I’m shooting.

Night Risks

If you intend night shooting (lamping or NV) then you need to walk every square yard of your new permission during daylight to check for hidden hazards. Long grass, nettles and weeds can hide a multitude of sins. A risk assessment tour before the spring flush will help reduce exposure to hazards … for both you and your dog. Agricultural flotsam and jetsam can often lie rusting beneath foliage and injure either of you.

Slip, Trip and Fall hazards

Hollows, ditches, dykes and ponds should all be noted. The dry dykes I cross in summer can contain five feet of water in winter. The sheer cliff on the side of a marl pit can be obvious in winter but hidden by shrubbery in summer. Badger setts, particularly satellite holes, can be ankle-breakers when covered by autumns leaf-fall. So can wood warrens. Cattle grids can be covered in snow. Learn where they are. On one of my permissions there are brick-built game bird drinkers which can be covered in briars and nettles when neglected.

Climbing Hazards

Many shooting permissions have random access points where beaters or part-time keepers need to cross but haven’t put in permanent structures. There is very good reason for this. Despite the risk of ‘vicarious liability’ through injury to intruders, no landowner wants to make it easy for a poacher or trespasser to cross their land. This spot suits me fine, thanks.

Utilities

Don’t forget to check the utility infrastructure too. Telephone poles & lines, electricity cables or gas supplies; look out for water pipes, butts and troughs too. Damage any of these through shooting and you won’t hold onto the permission for very long.

 

Copyright Ian Barnett, Wildscribbler, Oct 2018